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Production Planning

  • 1.  Production Planning

    TOP CONTRIBUTOR
    Posted 22 days ago

    I would like to understand how other companies govern their manufacturing processes?  We have customized NAV to help manage our jobs, but it's still largely a human process for us.  As we have grown and when a location reaches 80+ percent production capacity, our on-time delivery starts to take a hit.  Not every solution should involve adding more bodies or manufacturing equipment and we would like to make sure we are as efficient as we can be with our existing infrastructure and staff.

     

    We have been evaluating different planning and forecasting solutions, but I am hoping to learn how others address this and if you did introduce other software into the mix, can you share the benefits you recognized (before and after)?

     

    Thanks in advance!



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    Anthony Darden
    Vice President - IT
    Protective Industries, Inc.
    Buffalo NY
    NAVUG All-Star
    NAVUG CIO Council
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  • 2.  RE: Production Planning

    GOLD CONTRIBUTOR
    Posted 21 days ago
    @Anthony Darden are jobs equal to production orders?  What version of NAV/BC are you using?  Are you using infinite or finite planning?  What sort of customizations were needed?  Also, how many "jobs" are you trying to manage at one time on the floor?  How long is a job on the production floor from start to finish?  On the surface it sounds like a visual scheduling solution would help you see the bottlenecks coming when you near the 80% utilization.     ​

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    Jason Nicolaou
    Engagement Manager
    Sikich, LLP
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  • 3.  RE: Production Planning

    TOP CONTRIBUTOR
    Posted 21 days ago
    Hi @Jason Nicolaou - you are correct, jobs are equal to production orders.  We are on NAV 2018 domestically and will be launching BC SAAS for our international locations later this year.  Our customizations were put in place years ago to help manage the volume of orders hitting the production floor, but it's still a manual process that tends to look at the current week and nothing beyond that...and so when an expedite hits or a machine goes down, the domino effect is just too much for a human to manage.  We have 200+ production machines and manage at least that number of orders each day.   I'm interested to know the different solutions people have experience with and what the immediate benefits were that came out of that?

    Thanks!​

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    Anthony Darden
    Vice President - IT
    Protective Industries, Inc.
    Buffalo NY
    NAVUG All-Star
    NAVUG CIO Council
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Production Planning

    Posted 18 days ago
    Hi Anthony;
    I have worked with manufacturing software for over 30 years and when it comes to scheduling and throughput I have found that constraints are more often the problem versus capacity.
    Often on paper it looks like you can get the work done, however given that some work centers are constraints they hold up production for all the other work centers.
    Basic NAV allows you to define a work center as a constraint and finite schedule it.  The trick is identifying the constraints and understanding that you should limit the number of constraint work centers.

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    Fred Holst
    Sign Zone LLC
    Brooklyn Center, MN
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  • 5.  RE: Production Planning

    Posted 17 days ago
    I agree with my friend Fred, it looks like you have 8 hours to schedule, 16 hours to schedule, or more, but you have an employee who really is a constraint because they needed to cut this item or operate that machine, the rest of employees are for machine setup and material movement. It is hard to find constraints vs capacity in real-time.

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    Greg Jankowski
    Concordia Publishing House
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  • 6.  RE: Production Planning

    GOLD CONTRIBUTOR
    Posted 21 days ago
    Hi Tony,

    As we have discussed many times, every company reaches a stage where brute force will no longer suffice.

    The threshold can be many, but these are the three we typically encounter:
    • physical, too much work for for the number of personnel assigned to the scheduling 
    • risk, as typically just a small handful of people who most of the critical knowledge
    • Timing, it simply takes too long for the manual process to complete or respond to changes
    Regardless, there are several solutions available in the ISV/AppSource marketplace as well as outside of our typical Dynamics universe.  Defining with your team the most critical aspects of your scheduling process and how automation would help alleviate strain or improve throughput is a good first step.  From there, you can create a requirements list to begin to evaluate possible solutions.

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    Tom Doran
    Chief Marketing Officer
    Innovia Consulting
    niles IN
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